Youth Program

Subcategories from this category: Green

“I’ll clear one question up for y’all before you ask it because I know you’re going to eventually,” said the thin and soft-spoken cadet, “that fuzzy stuff up on the rigging is called baggy wrinkle; we make it from old dock lines and it’s used as chafe protection for our sails.” From the aft deck of the USCGC Eagle eight young necks, including my own, craned up to get a better look at what our guide was pointing to.b2ap3_thumbnail_IMG_7663.JPG

I imagine hundreds of people will be told the same thing in the same spot and look upwards in the same way this weekend, but their experience will be different. They will not look up to see two headsails and four staysails trimmed for a westerly breeze. They will not look over the rail to see water streaming past the massive white hull. They will not be cooled by evaporation of salt spray from the bow wake of the 45 foot response boat that shuttled us across to the Eagle.

At Courageous young people not only learn to sail, but also gain a truly special new perspective on their home city. From the tiller of a 19 foot keelboat the harbor seems massive to a young person, made more so by the few inches that separate them from the water. On the deck of the 295 foot Eagle, one feels small again, not from ferries and pilings but from the three massive masts supporting all 22,280 square feet of her sail area.

I have never heard the word “explore” used more on a sailboat than I did from the three campers and four instructors in training that accompanied me on the Eagle yesterday. We wove through the clusters of sharply dressed big wigs and dignitaries who dotted the fore and aft decks. While the other guests stayed close to the rails for pictures of the harbor, the kids poked around on the lower main deck leaving no open door or hatch uninvestigated. Their interest was understandable, they see the skyline from the water every day, how often do you get to see a Laundromat behind a waterproof steel door?!

Despite being the youngest people aboard the IITs and students were given a great deal of respect and attention from the crew. One of the students asked our guide if the coast guard ever raced and he immediately brought another cadet over to us who introduced himself as a member of the coast guard’s offshore racing team. He asked the students and IIT’s about their sailing experience, about racing and what it was like to learn to sail in Boston. He put in one last plug for offshore racing before being pulled away for his duties preparing the dock lines.

As we approached the navy yard excitement grew and we found an open spot on the starboard rail. “Is that really step two down there?” one student asked, “I didn’t know we looked that small!” Fingers were pointed and waving hands exchanged between us and our fellow campers and coworkers below.

Soon we were tied to pier 4 and looking down at the roof of the boathouse. Though the docking was fascinating, the taunting aromas that wafted from the galley skylight below us and from the courageous barbecue made our departure from the ship a fast one. We thanked the cadets and the captain and made our way down the steep gangway thus ending a truly wonderful and unique experience.

I will never forget the day I sailed the Eagle to my home pier and I doubt the campers and IIT’s will either. Hurricane Harry said a child’s life is improved with 50 yards offshore; I bet 50 feet above the water helps too.

By Ian Hay, Courageous Assistant Site Director

            

I asked all of the Youth Program staff to write blog posts for me that show what Courageous means to them and/or about a story that embodies their time at Courageous. I feel it is only fair for me to do the same…

I came to Courageous in 2011 after calling Kate, the Youth Program Director, and asking if she was interested in hiring an Environmental Educator. She enthusiastically said yes. So in 2011 I started as the Step Green Program Coordinator, took a hiatus in 2012, then returned in 2013 as the Courageously Green Environmental Education Program Director- a continuation of the Step Green program. From there, I moved on to become the Youth Program Outreach Coordinator where I assisted the Youth Program in all aspects including hiring staff for the summer of 2014, finding at-risk Boston Public School students for the SwimSailScience program, and helping with program design, organization, and public relations.

Even with all of those titles and responsibilities, Courageous meant more to me than just a job. Courageous is a place where I learned, under the guidance of the Youth Program Director and Executive Director, how to become a fair, respected, and kindhearted leader. Courageous is a place where I honed my strengths in multitasking and delegation. I will always remember my time at Courageous as more than just working at a sailing center, but as a place where I made a community and witnessed one of the strongest, most sincere, hardest working non-profit organizations in the community sailing world.

Over the three years I have worked here, I have held the hand of a fearful little girl from Dorchester and helped her conquer her fear of sailing, inspired instructors to study Environmental Studies in their college careers, and hopefully acted as a role model for how to be a successful woman in the sailing and science communities. This is what Courageous really is- a spot where one can both be inspired and be an inspiration.  

And the sailing instructors and educators that I worked with at Courageous this summer are truly inspiring. They all care so deeply about the mission of our work and about changing lives by encouraging and teaching a passion for sailing. I will miss all of their random stories at the end of the day, their laughs about the weird activities that I plan, and their insightful questions about recycling and the environment.

As I move across the country and say goodbye to Courageous, I have no concerns about the future of this wonderful nonprofit. The leadership, instructors, and sailing students will keep this place thriving for years and years to come. In the end, I have to thank the two people who could never possibly understand how much what they do matters. Kate, the current Youth Program Director, is hands-down one of the hardest working people I have ever met. I will forever wonder at how she does so much, juggles so many boats, personnel, grants, and other various details. Kate has been an exceptional mentor, teaching me how to let go of the things that don’t matter and how to be passionate about the things that do matter- such as giving urban youth the opportunity to experience sailing and benefit from a fun, engaging summer youth program. I am truly lucky to have had Kate for a supervisor and even luckier that I can call her a friend.

And Dave, our current Executive Director, who is the other hardest working person I have ever met. I have to thank him for always believing in me and appreciating what I do. It is very rare to find a boss who has so many things on his/her plate yet still takes time to show how much he respects and values his employees. Dave has shown me how important it is to be a patient leader- that taking your time with certain decisions really does pay off. Having an Executive Director who is grateful, rational, and strong makes the employees work harder and better so they can live up to his example and make him proud, and in the end his leadership is what makes Courageous so successful.

Courageous Sailing is really the warm, sometimes a little wacky, community that everyone says it is. It keeps people returning year after year, looking for the meaningful purpose, the environment, and the heart that is at its core. I can’t wait to return after some time away to see all of the incredible things that is group has accomplished. Fair winds and see you all again soon :)

-Rebecca Inver, Youth Program Outreach Coordinator

 

 

Thank you to our donors

Distrigas Logo BNY Mellon State Street Logo
alphagraphics Triumph Modular Building americorps Parks and Rec premier capers catering peterson party center gordons wine and liquor Catering Name Tag