Courageous Sailing

A great Place for Sailing and SailBlind

SailBlind's involvement with Courageous Sailing Center (then Pleasure Bay) began in the late 1970's and early 1980's.  At that time, we weren't even called Sailblind, and Courageous Sailing Center had yet to develop with the docking of the 12-meter namesake at the present site. Harry McDonough was running Pleasure Bay, and we got a chance to sail on boats called Brutal Beasts, a cat boat with only a mainsail, no jib. Compared to our program of today, we had no "competitive branch" nor did we have all the techniques that we use today.  Instead, Arthur O'Neill and a few of us adventurous folks would get to Pleasure Bay and sail for a few hours under Harry's tutelage.  Occasionally, he'd come out in his little motorboat and "coach" us, admonishing us to steer straight and "for chrissake let the sail out!"

Then, sometime in the 1980's, we moved to the present site in Charlestown, Courageous Sailing. While sailing at the current facility, we became aware of the first World Blind Sailing Championship to be held in Auckland, New Zealand in 1992. It was at this point that CSC was instrumental in providing the boats and expertise so necessary to help in forging a competitive blind sailing team. At this point, the name SailBlind was born, and we have gone by that team name ever since.

Our association with CSC didn't end after the first World Blind Sailing Championship. In fact it developed even further, to the point where they host our Wednesday night practices (for the competitive sailors) and the recreational sailing program on Saturdays from June to early September. Additionally, they have hosted many regattas for blind sailing.

On a personal level, I have benefitted greatly from sailing at CSC, both as a competitive sailor practicing on Wednesday nights, and as an occasional participant in evening races. Dave and his crew have always been helpful to us by working with us to schedule practices and getting us into some of the Courageous weekly races. Of particular importance is that they were there for us prior to any of our major competitive events, particularly the World Blind Sailing Championships. By providing us with practice times and access to their boats, we were able to train prior to these events, even during some of the winter months.

Finally, I'd like to take this opportunity to thank CSC for supporting us, both as individual sailors and as a team. Your support of SailBlind certainly played a role in many of our teams medaling in the World Blind Sailing Championships over the years. Without your help, our achievements would have been made more difficult, if not impossible to attain.  May we have many more years working together.  Thanks, CSC for all you do in supporting us.

Matthew Chao