Blog posts tagged in Boston
This tag contains 6 blog entries contributed to a teamblog which isn't listed here.

By Emily Hart

This week we had our first group of Step 1 students in the sailing school. As the youngest learners, we hope to keep them coming back for years and it’s important to get them excited about Boston Harbor! We had a great discussion about the animals they see in the harbor and played a Web of Life game to create a visual food web. We had so much fun! In our ending discussion, we talked about how all of us can help to protect the animals in the harbor. “Don’t eat the creatures!” was one of our favorite suggestions, along with picking up trash and remembering that the things we do at home can still affect the oceans.

For the next group, I’ll be adding a Boston Harbor species matching game to help students identify the species living in the harbor and a few in the northeast. Check out a great interactive website and follow us in our learning: http://www.umb.edu/academics/environment/boston_harbor_marine_ecosystem

One more thing… I recently learned that there are only about 500 North Atlantic Right Whales left in the world. These whales don’t usually join us in Boston Harbor, but they feed off of Massachusetts in the spring. North Atlantic Right Whales were plentiful here before whaling, but populations have been failing to recover because of ship strikes and entanglement with fishing nets. This year, the calf count is up to 11 in 2014—great news! Check out the New England Aquarium’s Right Whale Research Blog to learn more about local conservation efforts: http://rightwhales.neaq.org/

in Green

Written by Step 4 Assistant Leader, Ian Hay

Today I regained my faith in adolescents’ possession of common sense. The day was intolerably muggy and boat assignments seemed dubious as I watched my students tack deep close reach to deep close reach up out of the Mystic. We had already narrowly escaped a minor uprising after I instructed the student at the helm to bear off sharply while passing under the Tobin so as to not cross beneath the falling stream of an ironworker mid-relief in the netting above. The plan for the day was to race PHRF-style out to G13 around R10 back to G13 and finish at the Tobin. 42.10:52 read my stopwatch as we passed G13 for the first time. Awesome.

“Who wants to learn how to heave-to?”

Lobstah swayed idly along as we waited for the J-22 to round the first mark. We finally spotted them off of Piers Park and decided to de-heave ourselves and go have a chat.

 “So guys what side of this harbor are green marks on?”  “We were trying to find our lay line.” “I take it you’re still looking for it?” “……When are we going in for lunch?”

The chat wasn’t having quite the effect I had hoped for so I instructed the other boat to at least round 13 and then we could head in together for an anchored lunch in the nook. Suddenly the wind came up and I watched something that looked oddly similar to a mainsheet block erupt out of the cockpit of the 22 heading straight for its mate at the boom.

“IAAANNNN! The mainsheet thing is broookeennnn!”

Funny that, maybe they (the blocks) got lonely being so far apart on an upwind leg. I instructed the student at the helm to go into safety and search for the missing pin and ringding. Hailing the Foredeck I prayed my kids would be able to fix it on their own. Sure enough, seconds after my fingers released from the VHF call button I saw the 22 ripping along at an over-trimmed broad reach, the blocks were chatting up a storm but from a kosher distance.

They (the students) had fixed their mainsheet before I even had to think about getting onto their boat. It may seem a small victory for step 4 cruising but it was a victory nonetheless. Today my students showed me that though they may act more like sea cucumbers during chalk talks than human children they can step up and fix a problem during stressful situations without being taught how to fix it in advance. And that put a smile on my face.