Green

Category contains 21 blog entries contributed to teamblogs

 

It is clear from Emily’s post that The Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean is an amazing organization who’s visit to Courageous Sailing Center is highly anticipated every year by students and staff alike!

I used to work for Rozalia Project as their Director of Outreach, so I know first hand how influential this organization really is.  Not only does Rozalia Project pick up trash from the surface of the water, the sea floor, and off beaches and coastlines around the country, but they also study the debris they find.  At Courageous, we use Rozalia Project’s data card to keep track of all the trash that we pick up.  This shows students that cleaning up debris really does make a difference and is part of important scientific studies.  Rozalia Project analyzes the data that we give them, along with their own data, to try to work towards solutions to marine debris. You can find Rozalia Project’s data card to use at your own facility here.

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Last week Step 1 split into two groups and did a "trash race" in the park to see who could pick up the most trash. They learned about marine debris and all of the reasons why it is harmful to animals and our economy. We learned that 70% of all the trash found in water comes from on land. Instructors helped collect the trash and tally it in various categories, a system created by the Rozalia Project for a Clean Ocean.
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This week is Crustacean Crusaders week!  We are lucky at Courageous that we have lobster traps along the dock that we can pull up so our campers can meet many sea creatures up close.  Among the common creatures that we find in our traps, most are crustaceans so our students are very familiar with local crabs and lobsters.  

Boston Harbor is home to many different crustaceans including barnacles, crabs, and lobsters, but our weekly activities focused on crabs.  After reviewing the characteristics of crustaceans, such as their jointed appendages, two pairs of antennae, and exoskeleton, we focused on the crabs found in Boston Harbor that are actually invasive species.  The European Green Crab and Asian Shore Crab are more common in Boston Harbor than some of our native species, such as Red Rock crabs and Jonah crabs. 

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As Claire mentioned in the last post, this week students learned about marine mammals as part of this week’s theme: “Marine Mammal Maniacs.”  At the beginning of the lesson I discuss with the students the definition of and facts about marine mammals.  Then, most importantly, I relate it back to local species and we focus on marine mammals found in Boston Harbor and Massachusetts. 

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Today in step 2, we taught the students general information on marine mammals. First, they all tried to figure out the five things that differentiate marine mammals from other animals that live in the sea. After that, the students got to see what it would feel like to have blubber, like some of the marine mammals. Each student stuck one hand in a bag of shortening.  Then they put both their covered hand and their uncovered hand in a bucket of
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