Youth Program

Subcategories from this category: Green

This week is Crustacean Crusaders week!  We are lucky at Courageous that we have lobster traps along the dock that we can pull up so our campers can meet many sea creatures up close.  Among the common creatures that we find in our traps, most are crustaceans so our students are very familiar with local crabs and lobsters.  

Boston Harbor is home to many different crustaceans including barnacles, crabs, and lobsters, but our weekly activities focused on crabs.  After reviewing the characteristics of crustaceans, such as their jointed appendages, two pairs of antennae, and exoskeleton, we focused on the crabs found in Boston Harbor that are actually invasive species.  The European Green Crab and Asian Shore Crab are more common in Boston Harbor than some of our native species, such as Red Rock crabs and Jonah crabs. 

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As Claire mentioned in the last post, this week students learned about marine mammals as part of this week’s theme: “Marine Mammal Maniacs.”  At the beginning of the lesson I discuss with the students the definition of and facts about marine mammals.  Then, most importantly, I relate it back to local species and we focus on marine mammals found in Boston Harbor and Massachusetts. 

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Today in step 2, we taught the students general information on marine mammals. First, they all tried to figure out the five things that differentiate marine mammals from other animals that live in the sea. After that, the students got to see what it would feel like to have blubber, like some of the marine mammals. Each student stuck one hand in a bag of shortening.  Then they put both their covered hand and their uncovered hand in a bucket of ice water to see how their covered hand didn't get cold. This was a great activity because each student was so excited and waited patiently for their turn. They even asked to go a second and third time! After this activity we played the no teeth game with marine mammal names. For this game, everyone sits in a circle and says the name of their marine mammal twice and then the name of some one else's marine mammal twice. This game has a catch though; you can never show your teeth. The students liked this game because it was fun, challenging, and helped them learn different marine mammal species and animals.

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Welcome to the Courageously Green blog!  Here, various staff from Courageous Sailing Center’s summer youth program will post tips, reflections, and other useful information about our Courageously Green Environmental Program.  

As the Environmental Education Program Director, my goal is to add science, nature, and experiential education lessons to the sailing curricula for the sailing students, ages 8-18.  My hope is that the sailing instructors will learn new games and facts that they can use with their students to entertain them and teach them about the marine environment.  By the end of the summer, I am sure the youth program employees and campers will be just as excited to learn about marine biology as they are to learn about sailing.

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